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State Pension age timetables

31 Aug 2018, 07:19

A colleague asked me if I knew any details of state pension age. I knew my SPA had risen from 65 to 66 but found this info which may be useful to others.

Edited

Changes to State Pension age
The age at which you can get your State Pension is changing.
When can I claim my State Pension?
The State Pension age is currently 65 for men. It’s gradually increasing for women from 60 to 65.
The exact date that you can claim your State Pension depends on when you were born.
Will the State Pension age change again?
There are more changes planned. From 2019, the State Pension age will increase for both men and women to reach 66 by October 2020.
The Government is planning further increases, which will raise the State Pension age from 66 to 67 between 2026 and 2028.
The proposals
Under the current law, the State Pension age is due to increase to 68 between 2044 and 2046.
Following a recent review, the government has announced plans to bring this timetable forward. The State Pension age would therefore increase to 68 between 2037 and 2039.

Increase in State Pension age from 65 to 66, men and women (edited table)
Date of birth Date State Pension age reached
*6 August 1954 – 5 September 1954 6 July 2020
6 September 1954 – 5 October 1954 6 September 2020
6 October 1954 – 5 April 1960 66th birthday

*So anyone born 6 August 1954 would be 65 years 11 Months on 6 July 2020


Full tables available at;

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310231/spa-timetable.pdf

State Pension age timetables

31 Aug 2018, 13:48

It's also possible to find out what your state pension age is by simply inputting your date of birth here. There are also other similar calculators online aswell.

Although the planned increase from 67 to 68 between 2037 and 2039, instead of between 2044 and 2046, will not be mirrored in any online tool at the moment, because that particular change hasn't become law yet.

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