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ANNOUNCEMENT : ALL OF ROYAL MAIL'S EMPLOYMENT POLICIES (AGREEMENTS) AT A GLANCE (UPDATED 2017)... HERE


Special leave

08 Feb 2019, 07:22

Hi guy's could anyone please confirm the procedure for special leave c. How many days do they have to let you know if you can have it.
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Special leave

10 Feb 2019, 22:41

TIME OFF: OTHER LEAVE August 2017 - Hope this helps ; A second page on personal leave is available on Employment policies at-a-glance

We know there may be times when you need time off to deal with family commitments, for example, or other responsibilities. Your manager will try to support you, and be as accommodating as possible. It’s important you speak to your manager as soon as possible, so they can help as much as they can.

Domestic Urgent domestic: There may be times when you need time off to deal with emergencies at home, e.g. your house is flooded or you’ve been burgled. Your manager can usually give you one day’s paid leave (this can be up to three days in exceptional circumstances.)*

Domestic events: On occasions when you need to be at home for some maintenance for example, or for a delivery, you should speak to your manager as soon as possible to make suitable arrangements. Options include taking holiday or unpaid leave, swapping shifts or making the time up. *Additional days may be covered by holiday or unpaid leave

Family Dependant’s leave: Where there is an immediate need to make alternative care arrangements for a dependant (e.g. their child-minder is sick). Leave is normally one day unpaid with further days either unpaid or covered by annual holiday.

Family emergency leave: Where there is an immediate need to deal with a more serious emergency to do with a dependant e.g. they are injured, give birth, or there is a death. Leave is normally one day with pay, with further days either unpaid or covered by annual holiday. Exceptional circumstances might warrant three days with pay.

Bereavement: It’s an upsetting time when someone close to you passes away. Managers will do their best to allow you time to deal with your loss. • Your manager can provide you with up to one week’s paid leave for immediate family, e.g. next of kin or blood relative (spouse, civil partner, child, parent or sibling), to support you during this difficult time. • If a member of your family, e.g. grandparent or parent-in-law passes away, your manager can give you one day’s paid leave to attend the funeral. • For wider family or friends, you can agree with your manager whether to swap shifts, make up the time, take unpaid leave or holiday.

Family events: There are often events where you have no control over their date or time, e.g. a wedding or school concert. In these situations you should speak to your manager who may be able to give you holiday, or arrange for you to make up the time, swap your shift or take unpaid leave.

Long-term care for a dependant: It can be hard balancing work and caring for a dependant who is ill or unable to look after themselves. In these circumstances you should speak to your manager, who can help you explore your options. These may include alternative shift patterns or a flexible working arrangement. In longer term situations, unpaid leave of up to six months or a career break of up to two years can be arranged.

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