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Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 11:55

Afternoon

I'm close to my start date and seeing it as a positive thing starting at this time of year. I guess when I get through Christmas, I'll know from that, that I can get through most seasons.

Can anyone give me any tips or advice for working in winter? Dealing with the cold, what extra bits of uniform you need to buy or what can I expect to be supplied with from RM. I do have some concerns with starting in winter but trying to find a balanced argument as most of my concerns are negative rather than positive - which I'm sure there are some positives?

Cheers


Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 14:21

Smatthew wrote:Afternoon

I'm close to my start date and seeing it as a positive thing starting at this time of year. I guess when I get through Christmas, I'll know from that, that I can get through most seasons.

Can anyone give me any tips or advice for working in winter? Dealing with the cold, what extra bits of uniform you need to buy or what can I expect to be supplied with from RM. I do have some concerns with starting in winter but trying to find a balanced argument as most of my concerns are negative rather than positive - which I'm sure there are some positives?

Cheers


Thermal long Johns and warm socks are an essential purchase!

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 14:30

Yes you're right, if you can battle out the winter months the job will be so much easier to you in the summer.

As per uniform, if they don't issue you a stormproof which they might not, you might want to invest in a lightweight but fully waterproof jacket something red like this https://www.milletsports.co.uk/product/ ... lletsports

That jacket over a fleece was really effective at keeping me warm and dry.

Also a pair of waterproof trousers wouldn't go a miss https://www.millets.co.uk/mens/115125-b ... users.html

The proper full on rainy days will probably be few though. As long as you're home after your shift staying dry doesn't matter that much, I've seen posties who'll just get completely drenched like it doesn't bother them.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 14:37

I don,t think anyone can give you a definite answer as everybody is different. From my point of view I would deliver in -10degrees rather than +30 degrees (centigrade) as I can get warm if wrapped up properly and working at a reasonable pace. I do not suffer with cold feet or hands. However, I found it very difficult to deliver in extremely hot weather as it is very difficult to lose heat, and what with flies and insects and heat exhaustion, give me the winter for delivering any day.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 14:47

Waterproof trousers make a massive difference on the really wet days; when it's very cold wear a base layer (T shirt/vest will do), underneath your shirt; also also a warm hat and fingerless gloves. The company will supply you with boots so you just need a few pairs of walking socks to go with them. Pens that will write in wet weather are pretty handy too.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 15:16

They may not give uniform for first 3 months. Would advise comfortable combat trousers where you can easily walk up down stairs. Pockets handy too. Light storm proof jacket with room to add extra layers underneath if too cold. Heavy jacket a no no. You'll be surprised how warm and sweaty you get.
None of the RM uniform is waterproof. So if you get your own waterproofs, even better. Can always keep in bag if managers a ****, (which is highly likely) and wear if it's pouring. Comfortable waterproof shoes a must. Break them in way before you start.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 15:29

I agree with other posters on this thread: summer can be torture to work in but at least in winter you can dress accordingly. I wear merino wool leggings under my trousers (so toasty) and merino wool base layers on top. I don't bother with RM shirts/polo tops in winter. Waterproof socks are a must too! Like others have said RM clothing is not waterproof. I bought myself a second-hand Berghaus coat on ebay and that is actually waterproof. Also, something around your neck and I take spare pairs of gloves with me in case your hands get wet and then get cold. Preparation is the key! Good luck. Winter isn't as bad as you might think. I'm such a big wuss and I manage.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 15:57

Hat, Fingerless gloves and a decent waterproof coat. Don't bother with thermal pants just wear shorts :thumbup

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 16:50

[quote="CPTNemoUK"]Hat, Fingerless gloves and a decent waterproof coat. Don't bother with thermal pants just wear shorts :thumbup[/quote

shorts all the way. just bang waterproofs on if and when it pisses it down

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 17:37

Personally I wear shorts all year. Depends where you are though. Probably wouldn't wear them if I was in the Scottish highlands but in a city it's a bit warmer. Then put waterproof pants on if it pisses down. But in general it's worse having wet trousers than wet legs.

Fingerless gloves.
Wooly hat.
Rash guard/under layer for body. Keeps you warm while wearing lighter clothes. I'm not a big fan in having lots of bulky layers.
Invest in good socks. They really stop the blisters. Don't just plump for cheap socks.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 17:37

Just done a quick Google search, this is the way to go !
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 17:43

kingeric wrote:Personally I wear shorts all year. Depends where you are though. Probably wouldn't wear them if I was in the Scottish highlands but in a city it's a bit warmer. Then put waterproof pants on if it pisses down. But in general it's worse having wet trousers than wet legs.


The stormproof + shorts is often my goto choice for days between spring and autumn when it's going to totally chuck it down. Wet trousers are pretty horrible if you're getting in & out of a van all day on a rural, whilst wet legs are just ignorable. Waterproof socks (e.g. Sealskinz) can be a good option too! For the winter months, well I'm likely to wear the RM waterproof trousers over my normal trousers if it's cold enough even if it's not raining as I'll likely want the extra layer of insulation.

Thick socks that come up to your knees are a good choice for the cold days too. The extra insulation on your lower legs seems to result in the blood reaching your feet being warmer, thus helping keep your feet warmer. If it's looking like a total freezing day (or if there's been a heavy snowfall, with the consequent risk of getting stuck on a farm track somewhere) then a long sleeve t-shirt under my red shirt can come into play too.

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 19:54

Some great information there thank you. I have some Gore Tex walking boots. Do you think these will be too heavy or it's best to get something more lightweight but equally as waterproof?

Consensus so far: hat, fingerless gloves, lightweight jacket (red), walking trousers, thick and decent socks. Preferably waterproof too. I've got a little bit of shopping to do then!

Winter new starter

10 Oct 2017, 19:56

Lincox wrote:I don,t think anyone can give you a definite answer as everybody is different. From my point of view I would deliver in -10degrees rather than +30 degrees (centigrade) as I can get warm if wrapped up properly and working at a reasonable pace. I do not suffer with cold feet or hands. However, I found it very difficult to deliver in extremely hot weather as it is very difficult to lose heat, and what with flies and insects and heat exhaustion, give me the winter for delivering any day.


I agree, I've never worn waterproofs or even a jacket, the fleece, a woolly hat and a jumper does me in the winter. But as you say I'm sure it's different t'up north, and if you feel the cold or not, don't sweat it though you'll work it out as you go......actually I do fingerless gloves, they're a god send......

Winter new starter

11 Oct 2017, 11:57

Smatthew wrote:Some great information there thank you. I have some Gore Tex walking boots. Do you think these will be too heavy or it's best to get something more lightweight but equally as waterproof?

Consensus so far: hat, fingerless gloves, lightweight jacket (red), walking trousers, thick and decent socks. Preferably waterproof too. I've got a little bit of shopping to do then!

Also while out shopping buy yourself some plasters and paracetamol.

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