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Autism

17 Apr 2017, 17:30

I am worried about one of my colleagues. I think he have Autism or something, based on how he acts, but I know that he tries to be friendly with everyone, doing favours for people, and helping people with there computers.

A lot of people seem to think that it is okay to be really rude to him, calling him names, pushing him out of the way and accusing him of being stupid. This is stressing him out, and I am sure I have heard him talking about suicide.

This happens in front of managers, but they wont do nothing about it.

I would like to help, but I am not sure how to begin. Our Union rep has just left, and I dont know what to do.

Can anybody give me some advice?

Autism

17 Apr 2017, 17:53

The fact that he may be on the autistic spectrum isn't really relevant other than it may be making it difficult for him to understand the social interaction and because he responds differently to social cues the idiots in your office think he's stupid. (Ironic or what?).

At the end of the day if you see bullying you have to challenge it and report it even though it might make you a target. If nothing is done take it higher. You need to have a serious word with your manager first and allow him/her the chance to address the situation.

As for his personal safety is it possible that you could find out if there is a family member or close friend you could contact? Other than that if you believe their is a real chance he could self harm it might be best to contact the authorities.

Autism

17 Apr 2017, 17:59

Anyone experiencing bullying or harassment at work can call the helpline number 0800 58 74 777.

Autism

17 Apr 2017, 18:47

Thanks for the help. I know hes been on firms for a while, if hes in tomorrow i will give him the number.

Autism

17 Apr 2017, 18:58

alloria wrote:I am worried about one of my colleagues. I think he have Autism or something, based on how he acts, but I know that he tries to be friendly with everyone, doing favours for people, and helping people with there computers.

A lot of people seem to think that it is okay to be really rude to him, calling him names, pushing him out of the way and accusing him of being stupid. This is stressing him out, and I am sure I have heard him talking about suicide.

This happens in front of managers, but they wont do nothing about it.

I would like to help, but I am not sure how to begin. Our Union rep has just left, and I dont know what to do.

Can anybody give me some advice?

I have autism, they laugh & make fun of me every day for over 20 years especially the women, the problem with bullying like this is it does effect you, people with autism do not have a lot of confidence in the own ability. Bullying like this effects you out of work as well, I stopped going out only when I had to it made me paronoid, I thought everybody was laughing at me, many times I have come to close to ending my life because of how it effects you, the funny thing is when I am not at work my confidence does start to come back a bit, people tell me the old you is coming back. Many people will say why do you not leave, the question I ask many times, it took me a long time to get a job all my life I have struggled fitting in. The bullying helpline is a waste of time you need people locally you can talk to not somebody on a phone miles away is no good, there powers are limit, with autism you have problems with lots of people not just a few there not going to get rid of 10 to 15 people when there's only 90 there to begin with.

Autism

17 Apr 2017, 19:59

I have a brother with Asperger syndrome (on the autism spectrum for the uninitiated) he has real issues dealing with people. However, he is amazing at dealing with logical problems. People need to realise that autism is not always diagnosed. Deal with each individual as you see them. But if you see a person being harassed you must intervene!! This is not about RM. This is someone's life. STOP THINK AUTISM. As a parent of an autistic child I know that treated with the correct respect and actuallly moderating your method of dealing/communicating with the individual will produce much better results. In years gone by people goaded these individuals to produce a reaction this is not acceptable. If you wish please PM me I'll try to advise on the next steps.

Autism

17 Apr 2017, 22:30

Follow fish tanks advice.

Autism

17 Apr 2017, 22:34

Help is available if you’re concerned for yourself, or a colleague

If you are concerned about your own or a colleague’s mental health, recognising the signs and asking for help can turn things around.

This year we have produced a series of five short films, in partnership with The Mental Health Foundation, to help support colleagues. The films also offer advice to those wanting to support a colleague or friend who is struggling.

You can also find advice and support on our website http://www.rmgfirstclasssupport.co.uk or at http://www.feelingfirstclass.co.uk.

https://www.myroyalmail.com/news/2015/0 ... th-support

Autism

18 Apr 2017, 14:54

alloria wrote:I am worried about one of my colleagues. I think he have Autism or something, based on how he acts, but I know that he tries to be friendly with everyone, doing favours for people, and helping people with there computers.

A lot of people seem to think that it is okay to be really rude to him, calling him names, pushing him out of the way and accusing him of being stupid. This is stressing him out, and I am sure I have heard him talking about suicide.

This happens in front of managers, but they wont do nothing about it.

I would like to help, but I am not sure how to begin. Our Union rep has just left, and I dont know what to do.

Can anybody give me some advice?


It's easy to say what you would do on the relative safety of the internet, but my advice would be to do 3 things,
1. Inform management that you have witnessed what you perceive as bullying and make it official. Force them to take their responsibilities seriously.
2. Ask some colleagues that you like if they share your opinion on what is happening.
3. (the hardest one) Next time you see it happening, step in. Just say something like "Oh, leave him alone for God's sake, you're always picking on him." Enough to let them know that you find their actions objectionable. If that paints a target on your back, then back to step one.

Sometimes you need to be the first one to stick your head into the firing line and you'll hopefully find that others will follow your example.

Incidentally, whether he has autism or not should be irrelevant to how he is treated, but it can have a more profound effect on how he feels.

There is of course a step 4. Contact your area rep for more detailed advice and support.

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